Monthly Archives: January 2021

New! CWW systematic review of global soil-transmitted helminthiasis prevalence and intensity studies

CWW is pleased to share a systematic literature review1 titled, “Qualitative systematic literature review of global soil-transmitted helminthiasis prevalence and intensity studies.” The literature review was undertaken to assess the availability and quality of STH data starting from 2006, when several STH endemic countries began implementing mass drug administration for STH control.

The literature review included 209 studies published between 2006 and 2018 that fit the inclusion criteria. Findings from the literature review indicated that the available STH epidemiological data are “fragmented, mostly of questionable quality, and minimally useful for regional or global program decisions.” The authors recommend a standardized approach to gathering STH program data, based on a comprehensive global monitoring and evaluation framework that will allow for pooling of information across countries and regions to guide global policy and progress.

1Diaz, Michael R., et al. (2020) Qualitative systematic literature review of global soil-transmitted helminthiasis prevalence and intensity studies.

 

 

 

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Post-intervention epidemiology of STH in Bangladesh: Data to sustain the gains

Dhakal, S., Karim, M.J., Kawsar, A.A., Irish, J., Rahman, M., Tupps, C., Kabir, A., Imtiaz, R. (2020). Post-intervention epidemiology of STH in Bangladesh: Data to sustain the gains. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 14(12): e0008597. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008597 

 

 

 

 

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Qualitative systematic literature review of global soil-transmitted helminthiasis prevalence and intensity studies

Author Summary

STH prevalence and intensity measures form the basis of WHO goals and action thresholds for national programs in endemic countries. Considering the importance of these STH burden measures, we conducted a published literature review from 2006 (start of drug donations) through 2018 to study the quality and distribution of evidence. We grouped the resulting studies according to their possible utility and application towards tracking the WHO and national program progress. Results confirmed the paucity and diversity of study methods, challenging generalization across regions or even countries, and lost efficiency of sparse research resources in this area. We conclude by suggesting standardized approaches to guide research that is closely linked to program actions and can guide global policy and progress.

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